Project CARS 2 Insiders Guide Episode 37

THE INSIDER’S GUIDE

In this week’s Insider’s Guide, we will be looking at Project CARS 2’s powerful photo mode that offers a wealth of camera and image editing options to add your own stylistic approach and taste to capturing the action.

 

To access the in-game photo mode, you can do so either from the Pause Menu of a Single Player session / race, or via the photo button of a replay.  Once in there, you have a wealth of options to utilize and take advantage of.

 

Camera Types

  • Cockpit Camera: Allows you to take photos from inside the cockpit of the car, from the position of the driver’s helmet.
  • Trackside Camera: Allows you to take photos from the side of the track. This uses the cameras from the replay, so the position of the camera is determined by the camera in use in the replay relative to where the car is situated on the track.
  • Drone Camera: Allows you to take photos with a free / drone camera. You can fly the camera around the environment to position the camera. Note: There is a limit as to how far away from the car you can fly the camera, and you are also limited to the confines of the barriers around the circuit.

 

Camera Movement

  • With the Drone Camera, you are able to move forwards, back, left and right, up and down, tilt the camera left or right and, of course, choose the direction the camera is pointing.
  • For the Cockpit and Trackside Cameras, you will only be able to choose the direction the camera is pointing (within certain limitations), and the tilt of the camera. You can’t alter the cameras position in the world.

 

Camera Options

  • Aperture: This will affect the Depth of Field in the image, and the range of distance over which objects will appear in focus. The higher the value, the large the sharp-focus area. The lower the value, the smaller the sharp-focus area.
  • Focal Length: The focal length acts like a Field of View (FOV) determining how much of the scene will be captured, along with adjusting the magnification. The higher the value, the more zoomed-in and narrower the FOV. The lower the value, the wider the FOV and lower magnification.
  • Focal Distance: The focal distance adjusts the point of hyperfocal distance which determines the balance of sharpness from the foreground to the background. The higher the value, the further away the sharp-focus area will be positioned from the camera’s location. The lower the value, the closer the sharp focus area will be positioned to the camera’s location.
  • Bokeh Shape: Bokeh affects the quality of out-of-focus blur in a photograph, with the shape of the aperture determining the softness of out-of-focus highlights. The higher the value, the softer the edges of bokeh blur will be. The lower the value (or alternatively set to 0), the harsher the edges of bokeh blur or, in the case of it being set to 0, bokeh blur will be removed entirely.
  • Shutter Speed: The shutter speed determines the amount of motion blur in a photo. The faster the shutter speed, the sharper an action shot will appear, whereas the slower the shutter speed, the more moving objects will be blurred along the direction of motion.
  • Tracking Speed: This simulates how well the camera has tracked an object in motion, with a value of 0 matching the tracking speed to the movement speed of the car in perfect focus, and the further the value moves from 0 (in either direction) will determine how poorly the car in focus was tracked, creating more blur of the environment and/or car.

 

Image Editing

  • Photo Filter: A selection of different filters that can be applied to the photograph, replicating different lens filters that could be attached to the camera.
  • Photo Filter Intensity: Allows you to adjust how effective or intense a selected filter is. The higher the value, the more intense the filter is. The lower the value, the less intense or effective the filter is.
  • Vignette: Allows you to adjust the image’s brightness at the edges in comparison to the centre, creating a soft, dark border. The higher the value, the darker the edges of the screen will become. The lower the value, the less (or no darkness) will be applied to the edges of the screen.
  • Frame: Allows you to add a harsh, dark border or frame to the image. The higher the value, the larger the dark border will be around the image and the less space will be viewable in the centre of the photo. The lower the value, the less (or no dark border) will be applied to the edges of the image.
  • Contrast: Allows you to adjust the scale of difference between black and white in an image. The higher the contrast value, the brighter the highlights, bold colours, and darker shadows will appear. The lower the value, the narrower the range of tones will become, resulting in a more washed out effect.
  • Exposure: This will be used to control how light or dark the image will appear by limiting the amount of light passing through the lens. The higher the value, the brighter the image will appear. The lower the value, the darker the image will appear.
  • Saturation: Adjusts the amount of colour in an image. The higher the saturation value, the bolder and more vibrant the colours will become. The lower the saturation value, the more colour is removed from the image, resulting in a more greyscale image.
  • Film Grain: This will adjust the amount of grain effect added to the image. The higher the value, the greater (and more grain) will be visible in the image. The lower the value, the less grain effect will be visible (or none if set to 0).
  • Chromatic Aberration: This creates an effect from the result of failing of the lens to focus all colours to the same convergence point. This therefore creates a blur around the edges which can also include colour. The higher the value, the greater the chromatic aberration effect will be, with more blur on objects further away from the centre of the screen. The lower the value, the less chromatic aberration effect or none when set to 0.

 

As well as these options, you can also hide the UI to view the image in full with all the settings that you currently have set. Then finally, of course, you can take a photo that you currently have set up, which then becomes viewable from the Main Menu > My Profile > Images. All the photos that you have taken in the photo mode will then be viewable in-game from this area, for you to see your final creation.

 

Now before you get yourself trackside to start snapping away, get a briefing from Yorkie065 on how to utilize the photo mode effectively and create the perfect photo with this week’s episode of the Insider’s Guide.

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