Project CARS 2 Insiders Guide Episode 38

THE INSIDER’S GUIDE

A forever debated topic in the sim racing community is Field of View (FOV), and in this week’s Insider’s Guide, we will be looking at the FOV & Camera settings available in Project CARS 2.

 

FOV Settings

Field of view is a crucial aspect to get right whilst also retaining your own comfort levels. By right, I mean a correct FOV with respect to real world. The reason for this is the fact that it is much easier to judge distances correctly with a correct FOV, and therefore you’ll find yourself being far more accurate and consistent in your driving.

 

One of the downsides, however, is that things feel slower because it will appear as if there’s a lower sense of speed. Despite that, though, the benefit to an accurate FOV far outweighs this aspect, and it is kind of mute anyway as the environment and how close things are surrounding you has a bigger impact on this.

 

Using FOV calculators that can be found online, you can work out the correct FOV for your own setup which you can then apply in-game.

 

Your ‘correct’ FOV can vary a lot, depending on the size of your monitor or TV screen, and how far away you sit from it. If you’re on a console and play with a controller from the other side of the room to your TV, for example, it won’t make much sense to follow the FOV value given by the calculator: in this instance, however, do try to stay close to your TV (providing that it’s still comfortable and you’ve read the safety warnings that comes with the game and your console).

 

If you’re sitting in a rig with the monitor only a short distance from your eyes, it is recommended to follow the recommended values by an FOV calculator.

 

A lower FOV may take some time to get used to, but having it set correctly will see you become a more consistent driver, and over time your lap times start to tumble. Your brain and eyes are programmed to judge distances in the real world, and FOV calculators are designed to match that, so having something vastly different only makes it more difficult for yourself to judge distances effectively.

 

When it comes to VR, the FOV is already pre-programmed and set up correctly for your VR headset, so you don’t really need to worry about adjusting it.

 

Within Project CARS 2, you are able to adjust the FOV of a number of different camera angles:

  • Bumper Camera
  • Bonnet Camera
  • Roof Camera
  • Chase Camera
  • Cockpit Camera
  • Helmet Camera

 

Only the Cockpit and Helmet cameras really require a good FOV setup.

 

Another set of FOV options in Project CARS 2 is the FOV Speed Sensitivity Settings. Here, if enabled, you can set a minimum and maximum FOV (Minimum Speed Sensitivity and Maximum Speed Sensitivity) that the game will adjust between, and at what speeds the feature will start adjusting between the two FOV’ (Minimum Speed Sensitivity Speed and Maximum Speed Sensitivity Speed). These options allow for a more cinematic and exaggerated experience, but aren’t recommended for a more realistic and serious approach to racing.

 

Movement Settings

High Speed Shake: This option, when enabled, will apply a subtle shake and vibration to the camera and car as your speed increases. It heightens your sense of speed and also helps to exaggerate bumps a little more.

 

World Movement: This option allows you to control the amount of visible movement between the car’s movement and the camera’s movement. Using a lower value will fix the camera to the horizon, making the car’s movement from bumps more exaggerated, and also affect the camera when going up and down hill, as the camera won’t follow the gradient of the hill like the car does. A higher value will fix the camera’s movement to match the movement of the car, so bumps become less exaggerated and the camera will follow the car and gradient when going up and down hills. Note: It is recommended to use higher World Movement values for VR as well as users who suffer from motion sickness, to reduce nausea caused by the disconnect of seeing car movement without physically feeling it.

 

G-Force Effect: This option allows you to control the amount of camera movement caused by the effects of G-Force such as heavy accelerating and braking, gear shifts and heavy impacts with other cars or objects. Using a lower value will see less movement from G-Force effects, whilst using a higher value will see more exaggerated movement from the camera from G-Force effects.

 

Show Helmet: When using the helmet camera, having this option on will display the inside of a helmet along the top and bottom of the screen, along with sounds being muffled to replicate the sense of wearing a racing helmet. Enabling this option will see the helmet template and muffled sounds turned on, however disabling this option will turn both off.

 

Helmet Depth Of Field: This option applies a blurring effect to the edges of the screen whilst keeping the track ahead in focus when approaching and driving through corners. This will see the cockpit of cars and their mirrors blur to keep the driver’s focus on the corner ahead, before sharpening again on a straight. Enabling this option turns the Depth of Field effect on, whilst disabling it turns it off. This option only applies to the Helmet Camera.

 

Helmet Look To Apex: This option is a feature where the camera will look in towards the apex of a corner when approaching and driving through it, following the flow of the circuit. Using a higher Look To Apex value will increase the amount to which the camera will look in towards the apex. Using a lower value will reduce the amount of camera movement or disable it entirely when set to a value of 0. This option only applies to the Helmet Camera.

 

Helmet Lean: This option controls how much the helmet template (if enabled) will lean in the direction of the corner when approaching a turn and driving through it. Using a higher value will increase the amount at which the helmet leans into the corner, where-as using a lower value will reduce the amount of lean or disable it entirely when set to a value of 0. This option only applies to the Helmet Camera.

 

Camera Lean: This option controls how much the camera will lean in the direction of the corner when approaching a turn and driving through it. Using a higher value will increase the amount at which the camera leans into the corner, and using a lower value will reduce the amount of camera lean or disable it entirely when set to a value of 0. This option only applies to the Helmet Camera.

 

It is recommended that the values of the Helmet Lean and Camera Lean match, or are very close to, one another.

 

The final thing that you can adjust in relation to driving cameras in Project CARS 2 is their position, with the ability to move them forward and back, up and down, and adjust the tilt angle of the cameras if you so wish. This can be done with the following default controls:

  • Camera Move Up: W
  • Camera Move Down: S
  • Camera Move Back: A
  • Camera Move Forward: D

 

Note: On console, the above options do not have a default key/button binding. If you wish to adjust the camera’s position, bind buttons to their controls, adjust the camera’s position to where you want, and then unbind the button assignments and re-assign the previous controls. The Camera Tilt Angle Up and Down options have no default key/button bindings on either PC or Console.

 

Now it’s time for Yorkie065 to give you further in-depth analysis and info on the FOV & Camera Options and how to get the most out of your FOV with this week’s episode of the Insider’s Guide.

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